ravenotation

My LibriVox recordings & my reading journal (solo Litblog).


The LibriVox Weekly Poem: “BOOH!” by Eugene Field

LibriVox Weekly PoemOn afternoons, when baby boy has had a splendid nap,
And sits, like any monarch on his throne, in nurse's lap,
In some such wise my handkerchief I hold before my face,
And cautiously and quietly I move about the place;
Then, with a cry, I suddenly expose my face to view,
And you should hear him laugh and crow when I say "Booh"!

Sometimes the rascal tries to make believe that he is scared,
And really, when I first began, he stared, and stared, and stared;
And then his under lip came out and farther out it came,
Till mamma and the nurse agreed it was a "cruel shame"—
But now what does that same wee, toddling, lisping baby do
But laugh and kick his little heels when I say "Booh!"

He laughs and kicks his little heels in rapturous glee, and then
In shrill, despotic treble bids me "do it all aden!"
And I—of course I do it; for, as his progenitor,
It is such pretty, pleasant play as this that I am for!
And it is, oh, such fun and I am sure that we shall rue
The time when we are both too old to play the game "Booh!"
 

"BOOH!" by Eugene Field (1850 to 1895) This week's poem can be found at this link.

Please click here to download or listen to my recording.


He’d Nothing but His Violin by Mary Kyle Dallas

LibriVox Weekly PoemLibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of:
“He’d Nothing but His Violin” by Mary Kyle Dallas (1837 ? -1897).

This was the weekly poetry project for March 10th to March 17th, 2013.

According to an article in the New York Times, Mary Kyle Dallas was born in Philadelphia, PA and married Jacob A. Dallis when she was twenty. She wrote for the New York Ledger for over fifteen years.
A few comments from our readers:
“What a lovely delicate little piece.” (AlanW)
“Here is my version of this sweet melodious poem. This one definitely rings a bell with me, as my wife and I were entertainers also (and even still do it occasionally) but not quite under such meager circumstances as this couple.” (LenXZ1)
(Summary by David Lawrence)
Please click here to download or listen to my recording.


The Red Flower by Henry van Dyke

LibriVox logoLibriVox volunteers bring you 27 recordings of The Red Flower by Henry van Dyke (1852-1933).
This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 11th to March 18th, 2012.

Dr. Henry van Dyke was an American author, lecturer, ambassador and pastor. He was in charge of the committee which wrote The Book of Common Worship of 1906, the first printed Presbyterian liturgy.
He wrote many poems, short stories, hymns and essays, often with religious themes.
This particular poem, written after the outbreak of World War I but set beforehand, contrasts the natural beauty of the summer before the war with the horror and destruction that is to follow.
(Summary by Lucy Perry)


 
http://www.archive.org/download/red_flower_1203_librivox/redflower_vandyke_rn_64kb.mp3″Running time=2m 17s (mp3@64kb)

This way to the download locations & the poem text…


An Apology for Sadness by Anne Lynch Botta

LibriVox logo LibriVox volunteers bring you 10 recordings of An Apology for Sadness by Anne Lynch Botta (1815-1891). This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 13 – March 20, 2011.

Anne Charlotte Lynch Botta was an American poet, writer, teacher and socialite whose home was the central gathering place of the literary elite of her era.

At Mrs. Botta’s receptions every Saturday night, attendees would find the most well-known writers, actors and artists, such as Poe, Margaret Fuller, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Bronson Alcott, Louisa May Alcott, Horace Greeley, Richard Henry Stoddard, Andrew Carnegie, Mary Mapes Dodge, Julia Ward Howe, Charles Butler, Fitz-Greene Halleck, Delia Bacon, Grace Greenwood, Bayard Taylor, William Cullen Bryant, Helen Hunt Jackson, actress Fanny Kemble, Daniel Webster, and many more. Her friend Kate Sanborn started her literary lecturing career at these receptions. Said a Boston writer: “It was not so much what Mrs. Botta did for literature with her own pen, as what she helped others to do, that will make her name a part of the literary history of the country.” (summary from Wikipedia)
http://www.archive.org/download/apology_forsadness_1103_librivox/apologyforsadness_botta_rn_64kb.mp3″Running time=59s (mp3@64kb)

This way to the download locations & the poem text…


The Consolation by Anne Brontë

LibriVox logoLibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of The Consolation by Anne Brontë (1820-1849). This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 14th – March 21st, 2010.
http://www.archive.org/download/consolation_0103_librivox/consolation_bronte_rn_64kb.mp3″Running time=2m 27s (mp3@64kb)

This way to the download locations & the poem text…


Life by Charlotte Brontë

LibriVox logoLibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of Life by Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855). This was the weekly poetry project for March 8th, 2009.
http://www.archive.org/download/life_bronte_0903_librivox/life_bronte_rn_64kb.mp3″Running time=1m 19s (mp3@64kb)

This way to the download locations & the poem text…