ravenotation

My LibriVox recordings & my reading journal (solo Litblog).


1st To Die notes; Chapters 8 to 10

cover for 1st To Die

Chapter 8

I sometimes have grave misgivings about news reporters and the fine line they sometimes cross to get the Big Story. Cindy Thomas is perhaps that type of reporter, hungry to be the next hotshot up & coming reporter with an eye on a Pulitzer maybe. She may have been able to bluff her way into the hotel and garner a few details of the homicide … Continue reading

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The Gates notes; chapters 9 to 10

The Gates

Chapter 9; In Which We Learn a Little About the Gates of Hell, None of Which Is Entirely Helpful
The title alone is not an optimistic one and I have my doubts as I begin the chapter.

It would be very tempting to do a blockquote of the majority of this chapter. I needn’t have worried about Samuel’s safety just yet as he, sensibly, is researching Hell, it’s gates, humans belief in Hell and other not very useful information for his current predicament. Hence the title, clever man that Mr. Connelly.
Again, the notes at the back of the book about the Sistine Chapel and Dante are quite amusing to read and even mentions the long term benefits of reading and knowing Shakespeare’s works.
I do feel sorry for poor Samuel, his research is pretty much in vain. Obviously, no mere mortal human being can sufficiently explain what Hell really is, and our resourceful hero is finding out that even the various religious and intellectual authorities haven’t a clue at all really. Continue reading


Once Bitten Twice Shy notes; chapter 9

Once Bitten, Twice Shy
Chapter 9
Jaz is jazzed, her eyes have been re-tuned it seems after the “feeding” and she seems to point out all the lovely colours she’s re-discovering to Vayl. There’s lots of oooo pretty going on while she updates Vayl on her research. There’s also a distinct change in her attitude, how long it lasts is anyone guess, even Vayl isn’t sure. No doubt he finds a calmer Jaz somewhat interesting though. I imagine it would be like finally meeting Dr. Jekyll after being in Mr. Hyde’s celebrated company for many months.

Jaz points out the senators faults, or lack off, and the preference of the mole being one of them rather than super-secretary Martha.

I just know, of all our suspects, if Martha’s the rotten link there’s no doubt we’ll be coming out of this bruised and bloody.

A formidable secretary indeed. Let’s hope it isn’t her, as a counter-measure she may do nasty things to Pete, & whoever else in the main office, instead. Continue reading


World War Z notes; Goodbyes chapters 8, 9 & 10

World War Z

Disclaimer: notes transcribed as is, no editing has been made so as to preserve my original feelings as I read the chapter.

Part 8, Goodbyes; Chapter 8, Arthur Sinclair, Junior.

Arthur has gone from very important job-role, running DeStRes, to becoming a money cop. His job is no less undesirable or difficult, probably more on both counts. I can’t quite get my head ’round the amount of work this man has to do both now and in the foreseeable future.
It seems he is trying, and possibly succeeding, in regaining faith in the American dollar & the banks. People are starting to move their hard-earned cash (pre & post war) from their Havanan havens to banks on in their home country.
Part of Arthur’s new job is to sort out the honest folk from those who are not so honest in their financial acquisitions.
Not exactly an envious job and one that very few individuals are any good at. Luckily, Arthur is not only trusted but reliably trustworthy and as a former SEC chairman, he knows the ropes. No need for re-training like with his former DeStRes job.

Of all the jobs I’ve done, being a money cop was best.

One of the more satisfying job-related moments has yet to come, though he is anticipating it.

Breckinridge Scott, yes, the Phalanx king, still hiding like a rat in his Antarctic Fortress of Scumditude.

A lot of people back home are waiting to see him, particularly the IRS.
[He grins and rubs his hands together.]

Continue reading this post


World War Z notes; Around The World And Above chapter 9

World War Z

Disclaimer: notes transcribed as is, no editing has been made so as to preserve my original feelings as I read the chapter.

Part 6, Around The World And Above; Chapter 9, Ernesto Olguin.

So the USS Saratoga eventually wound up as a “floating United Nations”, an interesting use for a decommissioned aircraft carrier. I’ve watched documentaries on the designing & building of such vessels. The constant evolution of the carrier are an engineering masterpiece of constant problem-solving. It makes sense that such a vessel would be used not only for the purposes of the U.N. but as a refugee transport. Aircraft carriers are, quite simply, floating cities. Able to house & support a great deal more people than any cruise or luxury liner. From what I’ve seen of these vessels, they seem rather more comfortable than you would expect. Certainly not as cramped as I originally envisioned.

Basically, this chapter relates the politics surrounding the U.N. conference. Ernesto was not a delegate at this event, merely a bystander, a naval attaché with a vested interest on the outcomes of various meetings.
It was also a sharing of ideas, he mentions demonstrations of the British fortified motorways and a live demonstration of Mkunga Lalem. The footnotes mention this to be “the world’s premier antizombie martial art” also known as The Eel and the Sword. Unfortunately Mr. Olguin does not elaborate on this technique. Pity, maybe when the book gets filmed I’ll get to see it.

The Saratoga served many purposes like this, conferences between many country’s representatives concerning trade & naval integration. Sounds like humanity was trying re-connect, albeit on a limited scale.
The highlight of the conferences seems to have been the global decision to stand & declare war on the infected or to simply make do and take a passive role in the future. Continue reading this post


The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; Notes on Chapter 9

Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The

Chapter 9. The Queen of the Field Mice

Disclaimer: notes transcribed as is, no editing has been made so as to preserve my original feelings as I read the chapter.

Straight away this chapter has Tin-man saving the life of the Queen. He does this act by attacking and killing her pursuer, a great Wildcat.
Baum seems to swing back & forth with Tin-man’s character. At first he has him abhorring violence & killing, but will easily throw out the pacifist ideals whenever he, and subsequently Tin-man feels like it. Yes, his actions are for a good cause, but does that make it the right thing to do. Debatable. Tin-man could have used his axe to frighten off the Wildcat instead of killing him.

Afterthoughts
Utilising mouse-power to save Lion from the toxic poppies was an expected course of action. As soon as Tin-man saved the Queen, I knew what was going to happen.
Overall, not much plot, just a stopgap to save Lion.
Tin-man’s character is becoming somewhat anomalous, to the point where I’m no longer certain about him. Morality is a tricky beast in real life, where nothing is ever black & white.
I may not be as sure of Tin-man as I was in the beginning but the author has since succeeded in making the character most complex and intriguing. Remember, this is fiction for children and Baum’s fairytale has surprising depth & complexity.