ravenotation

My LibriVox recordings & my reading journal (solo Litblog).


The LibriVox Fortnightly Poem: The Word of an Engineer by James Weldon Johnson

LibriVox Weekly Poem"She's built of steel
From deck to keel,
And bolted strong and tight;
In scorn she'll sail
The fiercest gale,
And pierce the darkest night.

"The builder's art
Has proved each part
Throughout her breadth and length;
Deep in the hulk,
Of her mighty bulk,
Ten thousand Titans' strength."

The tempest howls,
The Ice Wolf prowls,
The winds they shift and veer,
But calm I sleep,
And faith I keep
In the word of an engineer.

Along the trail
Of the slender rail
The train, like a nightmare, flies
And dashes on
Through the black-mouthed yawn
Where the cavernous tunnel lies.

Over the ridge,
Across the bridge,
Swung twixt the sky and hell,
On an iron thread
Spun from the head
Of the man in a draughtsman's cell.

And so we ride
Over land and tide,
Without a thought of fear—
Man never had
The faith in God
That he has in an engineer!
 

The Word of an Engineer by James Weldon Johnson (1871 to 1938) This fortnight's poem can be found at this link.

Please click here to download or listen to my recording.

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The LibriVox Fortnightly Poem: Twilight Voices by William Allingham


Now, at the hour when ignorant mortals
Drowse in the shade of their whirling sphere,
Heaven and Hell from invisible portals
Breathing comfort and ghastly fear,
Voices I hear;
I hear strange voices, flitting, calling,
Wavering by on the dusky blast,—
'Come, let us go, for the night is falling;
Come, let us go, for the day is past!'

Troops of joys are they, now departed?
Winged hopes that no longer stay?
Guardian spirits grown weary-hearted?
Powers that have linger'd their latest day?
What do they say?
What do they sing? I hear them calling,
Whispering, gathering, flying fast,—
'Come, come, for the night is falling;
Come, come, for the day is past!'

Sing they to me?—'Thy taper's wasted;
Mortal, thy sands of life run low;
Thine hours like a flock of birds have hasted:
Time is ending;—we go, we go.'
Sing they so?
Mystical voices, floating, calling;
Dim farewells—the last, the last?
Come, come away, the night is falling;
'Come, come away, the day is past.'

See, I am ready, Twilight voices!
Child of the spirit-world am I;
How should I fear you? my soul rejoices,
O speak plainer! O draw nigh!
Fain would I fly!
Tell me your message, Ye who are calling
Out of the dimness vague and vast;
Lift me, take me,—the night is falling;
Quick, let us go,—the day is past.
 

Twilight Voices by William Allingham (1824 to 1889) This week's poem can be found using this link.

Please click here to download or listen to my recording.


Old Santeclaus by Clement Clarke Moore

LibriVox Weekly PoemLibriVox volunteers bring you 10 recordings of:
“Old Santeclaus” by Clement Clarke Moore (1779-1863)

This was the fortnightly poetry project for December 1st to December 15th, 2013.

Clement Clarke Moore (July 15, 1779 – July 10, 1863) was an American Professor of Oriental and Greek Literature, as well as Divinity and Biblical Learning, at the General Theological Seminary of the Protestant Episcopal Church. He is the author of the yuletide poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, which later became famous as “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”. This poem seems to be a ‘moral’ version of “The NIght Before Christmas”.
Please click here to download or listen to my recording.


Better Far to Pass Away by Captain Richard Molesworth Dennys, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, who died of wounds received in the Somme Advance, 24th July 1916

LibriVox Weekly PoemBritish Legion PoppyLibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of:
“Better Far to Pass Away” by Richard Molesworth Dennys (1884-1916)

This was the fortnightly poetry project for October 20th to November 3rd, 2013.

At this time of year, we dedicate the Fortnightly Poetry project to the fallen in war. This poem, written at a time when the average life expectancy of an officer at the front was a mere six weeks, vividly demonstrates a young officer’s expectation and acceptance of his own death.
(Summary by Ruth Golding)
Please click here to download or listen to my recording.


Fire-Flowers by E. Pauline Johnson

LibriVox Weekly PoemLibriVox volunteers bring you 17 recordings of:
“Fire-Flowers” by E. Pauline Johnson (1861-1913)

This was the weekly/fortnightly poetry project for August 18th to September 1st, 2013.

Fire-Flowers is taken from the book, Flint and Feather: Collected Verse by E. Pauline Johnson. (Summary by David Lawrence)
Please click here to download or listen to my recording.


The Demon of the Gibbet by Fitz-James O’Brien

LibriVox Weekly PoemLibriVox volunteers bring you 12 recordings of:
“The Demon of the Gibbet” by Fitz-James O’Brien (1828-1862).

This was the fortnightly poetry project for February 10th to February 24th, 2013.

Fitz-James O’Brien was an Irish-born American writer, some of whose work is often considered a forerunner of today’s science fiction. After emigrating to the United States in 1852 he contibuted numerous articles in prose and verse to Harpers Magazine, Vanity Fair and Atlantic Monthly. He died IN April 1862 from severe wounds suffered in the American Civil War. (Summary from Wikipedia)
Please click here to download or listen to my recording.