ravenotation

My LibriVox recordings & my reading journal (solo Litblog).


Zorra Boys at Home and Abroad, or, How to Succeed by William Alexander MacKay

LibriVox logoWilliam Alexander MacKay (1842-1905)
By Zorra, in the following sketches, is meant a little district in Oxford county, Ontario, some ten miles square, composed of part of East and part of West Zorra, and containing a population of about fourteen hundred. It was settled about the year 1830, chiefly by Highlanders from Sutherlandshire, Scotland.

Within the last forty years there have gone from this district over one hundred young men who have made their mark in the world. With most of these it has been the writer’s good fortune to be personally and intimately acquainted; and companionship with some of them has been to him a pleasure and a benefit.

It is not intended to include all these in the following sketches; this were impracticable, but it is believed that a brief, unvarnished account of the career of some of them may be an inspiration, not only to the young men of Zorra to-day, but to men everywhere struggling against difficulties, and earnestly engaged in the conflict of life. Such sketches will also be to many a pleasant souvenir of early days, when

“Hearts were light as ony feather,
Free frae sorrow, care and strife.”

(summary by W.A. MacKay – 1900)

 
My contribution to this collaborative effort:-
02 – Sketch II. Alexander M. Sutherland
http://www.archive.org/download/zorraboys_1108_librivox/zorraboys_02_mackay_64kb.mp3″Running time=21m 14s (mp3@64kb)

 
12 – Sketch XII. Mervin Cody
http://www.archive.org/download/zorraboys_1108_librivox/zorraboys_12_mackay_64kb.mp3″Running time=13m 6s (mp3@64kb)

 
14 – Sketch XIV. Prof. Donald Mackay, B.A., Ph.D.
http://www.archive.org/download/zorraboys_1108_librivox/zorraboys_14_mackay_64kb.mp3″Running time=9m 51s (mp3@64kb)

This way to the download locations & the book text…


Library of the World’s Best Literature, Ancient and Modern volume 2 by Charles Dudley Warner, ed.

LibriVox logoThe “Library of the World’s Best Literature, Ancient and Modern”, is a work of enormous proportions. Setting out with the simple goal of offering “American households a mass of good reading”, the editors drew from literature of all times and all kinds what they considered the best pieces of human writing, and compiled an ambitious collection of 45 volumes (with a 46th being an index-guide). Besides the selection and translation of a huge number of poems, letters, short stories and sections of books, the collection offers, before each chapter, a short essay about the author or subject in question. In many cases, chapters contemplate not one author, but certain groups of works, organized by nationality, subject or period; there is, thus, a chapter on Accadian-Babylonian literature, one on the Holy Grail, and one on Chansons, for example.
The result is a collection that holds the interest, for the variety of subjects and forms, but also as a means of first contact with such famous and important authors that many people have heard of, but never read, such as Abelard, Dante or Lord Byron. According to the editor Charles Dudley Warner, this collection “is not a library of reference only, but a library to be read.”
This second volume contains chapters from “Anacreon” to “Auerbach”. (Summary by Leni)


 



 
My contribution to this collaborative effort is “05 – The Ugly Duckling by Hans Christian Andersen”.

http://www.archive.org/download/worlds_best_literature2_librivox/worldsbestliterature2_05_various_64kb.mp3″Running time=25m 11s (mp3@64kb)

This way to the download locations & the book text…


Library of the World’s Best Literature, Ancient and Modern volume 1

LibriVox logoThe Library of the World’s Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, is a work of enormous proportions. Setting out with the simple goal of offering “American households a mass of good reading”, the editors drew from literature of all times and all kinds what they considered the best pieces of human writing, and compiled an ambitious collection of 45 volumes (with a 46th being an index-guide). Besides the selection and translation of a huge number of poems, letters, short stories and sections of books, the collection offers, before each chapter, a short essay about the author or subject in question. In many cases, chapters contemplate not one author, but certain groups of works, organized by nationality, subject or period; there is, thus, a chapter on Accadian-Babylonian literature, one on the Holy Grail, and one on Chansons, for example.

The result is a collection that holds the interest, for the variety of subjects and forms, but also as a means of first contact with such famous and important authors that many people have heard of, but never read, such as Abelard, Dante or Lord Byron. According to the editor Charles Dudley Warner, this collection “is not a library of reference only, but a library to be read.”

This first volume contains chapters from “Abelard” to “Amiel”. (Summary by Leni)

My contributions to this collaborative effort:-
“16 – Essay on Joseph Addison by Hamilton Wright Mabie”
Running time=36m 9s (mp3@64kb)
http://www.archive.org/download/library_worlds_best_literature_01_1007_librivox/worldsbestliterature1_16_various_64kb.mp3″
and
“17 – Selected Works by Joseph Addison”
Running time=37m 52s (mp3@64kb)
http://www.archive.org/download/library_worlds_best_literature_01_1007_librivox/worldsbestliterature1_17_various_64kb.mp3″

This way to the download locations & the book text…


On the Nature of Things by Lucretius

LibriVox logoOn the Nature of Things by Titus Lucretius Carus, translated by John Selby Watson.
Written in the first century b.C., On the Nature of Things (in Latin, “De Rerum Natura”) is a poem in six books that aims at explaining the Epicurean philosophy to the Roman audience. Among digressions about the importance of philosophy in men’s life and praises of Epicurus, Lucretius created a solid treatise on the atomic theory, the falseness of religion and many kinds of natural phenomena. With no harm to his philosophical scope, the author composed a didactic poem of epic flavor, of which the imagery and style are highly praised. (Summary by Leni)

My contribution to this collaborative effort is “book 2, parts 1 to 3”.
Book II
Part 1; Running time=14m 26s (mp3@64kb)
http://www.archive.org/download/on_the_nature_of_things_1001_librivox/natureofthings_04_lucretius_64kb.mp3″
Part 2; Running time=35m 11s (mp3@64kb)
http://www.archive.org/download/on_the_nature_of_things_1001_librivox/natureofthings_05_lucretius_64kb.mp3″
Part 3; Running time=52m 58s (mp3@64kb)
http://www.archive.org/download/on_the_nature_of_things_1001_librivox/natureofthings_06_lucretius_64kb.mp3″

This way to the download locations for the rest of the book…