ravenotation

My LibriVox recordings & my reading journal (solo Litblog).

The Hag by Robert Herrick

LibriVox Weekly PoemLibriVox volunteers bring you 19 recordings of:
“The Hag” by Robert Herrick (1591-1674)

This was the weekly poetry project for October 20th to October 27th, 2013.

A poem for Halloween by the 17th century English author Robert Herrick. His poems were not widely popular at the time they were published. His style was strongly influenced by Ben Jonson, by the classical Roman writers, and by the poems of the late Elizabethan era. This must have seemed quite old-fashioned to an audience whose tastes were tuned to the complexities of the metaphysical poets such as John Donne and Andrew Marvell. His works were rediscovered in the early nineteenth century, and have been regularly printed ever since. (Summary by Wikipedia)

This project is catalogued at:
LibriVox and Internet Archive.
The poem text can also be found at this address.

My recording of this week’s poem has a running time of 1m 34s.
You can listen to it now, by clicking the following play button;
http://www.archive.org/download/thehag_1310.poem_librivox/hag_herrick_rn_64kb.mp3″

or feel free to download it in a choice of 3 formats:
mp3 128kb : mp3 64kb : ogg vorbis

The entire project, featuring all 19 readers of this week’s poem, is also available at this link.
The zip file size is 12MB with a total running time of 24m 23s.
All the files contained inside the zip are mp3, all with a bitrate of 64kb.

Book Coordinator:David Lawrence
Meta Coordinator:David Lawrence

The Hag

The Hag is astride,
This night for to ride;
The Devill and shee together:
Through thick, and through thin,
Now out, and then in,
Though ne’r so foule be the weather.

A Thorn or a Burr
She takes for a Spurre:
With a lash of a Bramble she rides now,
Through Brakes and through Bryars,
O’re Ditches, and Mires,
She followes the Spirit that guides now.

No Beast, for his food,
Dares now range the wood;
But husht in his laire he lies lurking:
While mischiefs, by these,
On Land and on Seas,
At noone of Night are working,

The storme will arise,
And trouble the skies;
This night, and more for the wonder,
The ghost from the Tomb
Affrighted shall come,
Cal’d out by the clap of the Thunder.

Advertisements

Author: raven

Anonymous ;-)

Comments are closed.